How to Understand HANA’s High CPU Consumption

Executive Summary

  • HANA has high CPU consumption due to HANA’s design.
  • The CPU consumption is explained by SAP, but we review whether the explanation makes sense.

Introduction to HANA CPU Consumption

A second major issue in addition to memory overconsumption with HANA is CPU consumption. When so much data is loaded into memory, it causes The CPU to spike. This is why CPU monitoring along with memory monitoring is considered so necessary for effectively using HANA. SAP offers a peculiar explanation for CPU utilization.

“Note that a proper CPU utilization is actually desired behavior for SAP HANA, so this should be nothing to worry about unless the CPU becomes the bottleneck. SAP HANA is optimized to consume all memory and CPU available. More concretely, the software will parallelize queries as much as possible to provide optimal performance. So if the CPU usage is near 100% for query execution, it does not always mean there is an issue. It also does not automatically indicate a performance issue”

Does This Statement Make Sense

This entire statement is unusual, and it does not explain why HANA times out. If an application or database is continually consuming all resources, the apparently the likelihood of timeouts increases. This paragraph seems to attempt to explain away the consumption of hardware resources by HANA that in fact, should be a concern to administrators. This statement is also inconsistent with other explanations about HANA’s use of memory, as can be seen from the SAP graphic below.

Notice the pool of free memory.
Once again, notice the free memory in the graphic.

This is also contradicted by the following statement as well.

“As mentioned, SAP HANA pre-allocates and manages its own memory pool, used for storing in-memory tables, for thread stacks, and for temporary results and other system data structures. When more memory is required for table growth or temporary computations, the SAP HANA memory manager obtains it from the pool. When the pool cannot satisfy the request, the memory manager will increase the pool size by requesting more memory from the operating system, up to a predefined Allocation Limit. By default, the allocation limit is set to 90% of the first 64 GB of physical memory on the host plus 97% of each further GB. You can see the allocation limit on the Overview tab of the Administration perspective of the SAP HANA studio, or view it with SQL. This can be reviewed by the following SQL
statement

select HOST, round(ALLOCATION_LIMIT/(1024*1024*1024), 2)
as “Allocation Limit GB”
from PUBLIC.M_HOST_RESOURCE_UTILIZATION”

Brightwork Disclosure

Financial Bias Disclosure

This article and no other article on the Brightwork website is paid for by a software vendor, including Oracle and SAP. Brightwork does offer competitive intelligence work to vendors as part of its business, but no published research or articles are written with any financial consideration. As part of Brightwork’s commitment to publishing independent, unbiased research, the company’s business model is driven by consulting services; no paid media placements are accepted.

HANA & S/4HANA Question Box

  • Have Questions About S/4HANA & HANA?

    It is difficult for most companies to make improvements in S/4HANA and HANA without outside advice. And it is close to impossible to get honest S/4HANA and HANA advice from large consulting companies. We offer remote unbiased multi-dimension S/4HANA and HANA support.

    Just fill out the form below and we'll be in touch.

The Risk Estimation Book

 

Software RiskRethinking Enterprise Software Risk: Controlling the Main Risk Factors on IT Projects

Better Managing Software Risk

The software implementation is risky business and success is not a certainty. But you can reduce risk with the strategies in this book. Undertaking software selection and implementation without approximating the project’s risk is a poor way to make decisions about either projects or software. But that’s the way many companies do business, even though 50 percent of IT implementations are deemed failures.

Finding What Works and What Doesn’t

In this book, you will review the strategies commonly used by most companies for mitigating software project risk–and learn why these plans don’t work–and then acquire practical and realistic strategies that will help you to maximize success on your software implementation.

Chapters

Chapter 1: Introduction
Chapter 2: Enterprise Software Risk Management
Chapter 3: The Basics of Enterprise Software Risk Management
Chapter 4: Understanding the Enterprise Software Market
Chapter 5: Software Sell-ability versus Implementability
Chapter 6: Selecting the Right IT Consultant
Chapter 7: How to Use the Reports of Analysts Like Gartner
Chapter 8: How to Interpret Vendor-Provided Information to Reduce Project Risk
Chapter 9: Evaluating Implementation Preparedness
Chapter 10: Using TCO for Decision Making
Chapter 11: The Software Decisions’ Risk Component Model

Risk Estimation and Calculation

Risk Estimation and Calculation

See our free project risk estimators that are available per application. The provide a method of risk analysis that is not available from other sources.

project_software_risk