References for Brightwork Oracle Support

Last Updated on March 15, 2021 by

Executive Summary

  • These are the references that were used for our Oracle Support articles.

Learn why so few entities in the IT space include references in their work. 

Introduction

This is the reference list for the Oracle Support articles, as well as interesting quotes from these references at Brightwork Research & Analysis.

Reference #1: Article Titled:

How Accurate Are Oracle’s Criticisms of Rimini Street?

https://www.oracle.com/rimini-street/trusted-support.html

https://seekingalpha.com/article/3965635-oracle-might-eating-porridge

https://rsf.org/en/china

https://www.forbes.com/sites/oracle/2018/12/06/oracle-v-rimini-street-lawsuit-a-guide/#7b4d130e8d40

https://www.riministreet.com/Documents/Collateral/Rimini-Street-Datasheet-Support-Program-Features.pdf

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/democracy-post/wp/2017/12/14/chinese-ownership-is-raising-questions-about-the-editorial-independence-of-a-major-u-s-magazine/

“As China grows increasingly powerful, its ability to constrain the free speech of organizations that wish to enter or flourish in the Chinese market grows in tandem. From tech giants to Hollywood studios to the American Bar Association, American organizations have censored themselves and their products to avoid offending Beijing. Forbes is far from the only media company to incite controversy with its China coverage. After Bloomberg published an excellent series on the family wealth of Chinese leaders in 2012, for example, Beijing retaliated by constraining the company’s ability to sell its lucrative terminals in China. The company then partially repudiated its earlier work. Sometimes “we … write stories that we probably may have kind of rethought — should have rethought,” Bloomberg chairman Peter T. Grauer said at the time. Yet Forbes, majority owned by a Hong Kong entity, has to contend with the possibility that officials in Beijing actively expect them to steer away from controversial China subjects.

Forbes’s reputational problems began before the 2014 purchase. The magazine drew flak for a contributor model that allowed writers to publish without any editorial input, forsaking the traditional gatekeeper model that editors play for writers. “I thought it was weird that I could literally publish anything,” a former Forbes contributor, who asked to remain anonymous, told me.”