References for Brightwork Oracle Database

Last Updated on March 15, 2021 by HostingandOther

Executive Summary

  • These are the references that were used for our Oracle Database articles.

Learn why so few entities in the IT space include references in their work. 

Introduction

This is the reference list for the Oracle Database articles, as well as interesting quotes from these references at Brightwork Research & Analysis.

Reference #1: Article Titled:

Larry Ellison on SAP and Salesforce Paying Oracle for DB Licenses

https://www.businessinsider.com/larry-ellison-sap-and-salesforce-pay-oracle-a-lot-of-money-2015-6

[Why Workday Is Different by Design, and Why It Matters]

(https://blogs.workday.com/why-workday-is-different-by-design-and-why-it-matters/)

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/06/01/workday-ceo-reveals-how-his-company-is-taking-share-from-sap-oracle.html

[Oracle is ‘irrational’ towards Workday – Business Insider]

(https://www.businessinsider.com/oracle-is-irrational-towards-workday-2015-5)

https://www.zdnet.com/article/look-at-what-google-and-amazon-are-doing-with-databases-thats-your-future/

https://www.forbes.com/sites/sap/2012/03/22/larry-ellison-calls-out-workday-for-two-fundamental-mistakes/#47c14614141c

Reference #2: Article Titled:

SQL Server is About to Pass Oracle as the Most Popular Database

https://seekingalpha.com/article/4044813-death-commercial-database-oracles-dilemma

Reference #3: Article Titled:

How Accurate Was Bob Evans on Oracle’s 2018 Q4 Being Due to the Autonomous Database?

*https://cloudwars.co/oracle-q4-earnings-call-autonomous-database/

*https://techcrunch.com/2012/08/09/open-yeah-sure-sorry-oracle-youre-still-full-of-it/

“Oracle put the “cloud” name on its products. But that’s just cloudwashing. Now if Oracle came out in support of OpenStack that would be another matter. Oracle makes its money selling enterprise licenses. In the future, enterprise shops will use a variety of different database environments such as Riak, Cassandra and Mongo DB. Bob also brings up IBM. Here’s the difference between the two companies. IBM has a legacy product portfolio but its behavior is entirely different. IBM is associated with the Linux movement. Oracle has been a terrible steward of Java and MySQL. Reese makes that point and it is what you hear often in the open source community.”

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/oracle-looks-old-ibm-210000672.html

Reference #4: Article Titled:

What Percentage of Oracle Customers are on What Oracle Database Version?

https://discovery.hgdata.com/

Extracted data from the website on (June 1, 2019) As the months pass, one would expect to see customers migrate to more recent Oracle database versions.

*https://palisadecompliance.com/why-companies-cant-move-off-oracle/

Application Interaction: Most of the Oracle applications require Oracle database licenses, even if a different database is used. This reduces the incentive to cut the cord to Oracle Support.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Database

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Reference #5: Article Titled:

How Accurate Are SAP and Oracle on Using One Giant Database?

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/exadata-data-consolidation-breakthrough-towards-boukadidi-mounir/

https://www.mongodb.com/what-is-mongodb

Reference #6: Article Titled:

Forbes Allows SAP to Vent Against the Oracle Autonomous Database for Money

https://www.forbes.com/sites/sap/2018/04/18/dont-fall-for-the-autonomous-database-distraction/#7e1a9f0d333a

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_automobile https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-model_database

Reference #7: Article Titled:

How Real is The Oracle Automated Database?

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/09/08/ellison_and_cos_equity_now_relies_on_a_80_oracle_stock_price_and_cloud_success/

Unrelated article that shows Oracle’s focus on executive compensation. Executive compensation (overcompensation) driven off of stock prices is a primary reason for the release of false information to the public. Lying in public announcements can also be seen as a way of communicating loyalty to the company.

https://aws.amazon.com/rds/oracle/ https://siliconangle.com/blog/2018/06/21/amazon-cto-cloud-offers-database-need/

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/10/08/oracle_openworld_2017_analysus/

In this article, The Register pushes back on Oracle’s claims for the automated database.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/oracle/2018/03/30/larry-ellison-oracle-is-revolutionizing-the-database-and-it-service-delivery/#4813b9e87a4d

The China-based publication Forbes (through acquisition several years ago) has this article by a Jeff Erickson, who is listed as an “Editor at Large for Forbes.” Its title is Larry Ellison is Revolutionizing Database and IT Service Delivery. One wonders if the author has any conflicts of interest by declaring this? Did Forbes consider this potential conflict? Or did Oracle paying them to publish the article at Forbes assuage these concerns? This article repeats outlandish claims by Larry Ellison, ensuring Jeff Erickson an excellent annual review it would seem. Claims include:

“This technology changes everything,” he said. “The Oracle Autonomous Database is based on technology as revolutionary as the internet.” “To set up, provision, and use Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud, a user simply answers a few short questions to determine how many CPUs and how much storage the data warehouse needs. Then the service configures itself typically in less than a minute and is ready to load data. Once the data warehouse is up and running, its operation also is autonomous, delivering all of the analytic capabilities, security features, and high availability of Oracle Database without any of the complexities of configuration, tuning, and administration—even as warehousing workloads and data volumes change.”

This article, written by Oracle, comes to a surprising conclusion about AWS. Can you guess what it is before reading it?

“AWS Comes Up Short – At the launch event at company headquarters in Redwood City, California, Ellison showed how Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud can run faster than comparable database offerings from Amazon Web Services, while being more scalable, and costing less.”

That is curious. I would have expected an article written by Oracle to praise AWS. How odd.

“In addition to running faster and thus costing less, Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud is truly elastic, Ellison said, while the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, ironically, is not. With the AWS service, “you pay for a fixed configuration” and when you want to add CPUs, you have to take the database down and wait, he said.”

Well, AWS’s service sounds genuinely useless. Probably no purpose in investigating it now is there. In the following article also by Jeff Erickson…

https://www.forbes.com/sites/oracle/2018/03/27/how-oracles-new-autonomous-data-warehouse-works/#7cf519de5c7f

Titled How Oracle’s New Autonomous Data Warehouse Works Oracle claims that an Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud allows a data warehouse to be set up in less than a minute.

“set up a high-powered data warehouse in less than a minute by answering just five questions: How many CPUs do you want? How much storage do you need? What’s your password? What’s the database name? What’s a brief description? “And that’s it,” says Keith Laker, an Oracle lead product manager for the company’s autonomous data warehouse. “Twenty-five seconds and you’ve got a high-performance data warehouse that’s ready to go.” And once the data warehouse is running, its operation also is autonomous, using the world’s most advanced database platform and machine learning to operate without human intervention, tuning and optimizing itself for top performance and patching itself without taking the system offline.”

Truly amazing. If Oracle has not yet, they should be recommended to Nobel Society for consideration for a Noble Prize. Finally, after decades, people now have a place to put their data as evidence by the following quotation.

“And that’s it,” says Keith Laker, an Oracle lead product manager for the company’s autonomous data warehouse. “Twenty-five seconds and you’ve got a high-performance data warehouse that’s ready to go.” And once the data warehouse is running, its operation also is autonomous, using the world’s most advanced database platform and machine learning to operate without human intervention, tuning and optimizing itself for top performance and patching itself without taking the system offline.”

And without a hint of the potential for overstatement, Jeff Erickson finishes off the article like this.

“Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud Service is the next-generation cloud service for the whole organization, with high performance and reliability and vastly reduced labor costs because it’s autonomous. The service runs as little as $1.68 per CPU hour, with storage as low as $148 per terabyte per month. Oracle customers can also bring their existing on-premises licenses to take advantage of Oracle’s BYOL program for PaaS services. Get details on the pricing page.”

https://www.oracle.com/database/autonomous-database/feature.html

Very little information is provided about the autonomous or automated database at the Oracle website.

https://www.sdxcentral.com/articles/news/oracles-ellison-touts-totally-automated-self-driving-oracle-database/2017/09/

SDX Central simply repeats Oracle’s claims verbatim in this article.

https://read.acloud.guru/why-amazon-dynamodb-isnt-for-everyone-and-how-to-decide-when-it-s-for-you-aefc52ea9476

*https://www.amazon.com/Rationality-Mortals-Uncertainty-Evolution-Cognition/dp/0199747091

Oracle’s new database uses machine learning to automate administration

VentureBeat simply repeats Oracle’s claims for the autonomous or automated database verbatim in this article.

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/systems-manager/latest/userguide/systems-manager-automation.html

https://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2017/10/08/oracle_openworld_2017_analysus/ Good comments on Oracle’s claims.

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/08/11/number_off_oracle_rounds_up_major_database_release_cycle_numbers/

Explains the jump for Oracle 12… to Oracle 18 Not on the automated database but new the new versioning. Included to clarify to readers confused about the jump from 12 to 18. “So what would have been Oracle Database 12.2.0.2 will now be Oracle Database 18; 12.2.0.3 will come out a year later, and be Oracle Database 19. The approach puts Oracle only about 20 years behind Microsoft in adopting a year-based naming convention (Microsoft still uses years to number Windows Server, even though it stopped for desktop versions when it released XP).”

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/07/24/oracle_in_memory_database_feature/

Describing costs of upgrading to Oracle In Memory